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Chicago ranks #1 nationwide in foreclosures

filed under: Buyers, Foreclosures, Lakeview, Sellers posted on July 9th, 2011

CHICAGO, FORECLOSURE CAPITAL OF THE NATION:

CHICAGO, THE NEW FORECLOSURE CAPITAL: Unfortunately, Chicago now leads the nation in the number of foreclosed homes. This 3-bedroom, 3-bath foreclosed house in Lakeview, which was listed at $586,000 at the end of 2009, finally closed last April for $405,000.

The Chicago area now has the largest inventory of foreclosed homes in the nation, and these abandoned properties take longer to sell here than in most other cities.

With 118,776 homes that are either bank-owned or in the midst of being seized by lenders, Chicago ranks first in foreclosures among the 20 biggest metro areas, according to RealtyTrac, a company that compiles housing data. Even the cities that were hit hardest by the housing bust, such as Los Angeles, Miami, Las Vegas, and Phoenix, had tens of thousands fewer homes in foreclosure when the data was collected in May. Los Angeles, for example, was #2 with 86,745 foreclosed homes.

As a realtor who regularly shows homes throughout Chicago, particularly on the North side, I can testify that many of the foreclosures here are: 1) concentrated in poorer, less desirable neighborhoods with older housing stock 2) in lousy condition, often missing kitchen appliances or pockmarked by signs of neglect, such as water leaks and mold 3) if they are condos, located in buildings that may have other foreclosures, short sales, units not paying their assessments or financial problems that make lenders unlikely to give a buyer a mortgage there 4) owned by banks that are disorganized, unresponsive, and even idiotic in their approach to selling the home.

In a story today in the New York Times, the glut of Chicago foreclosures is also blamed on Illinois law that protects delinquent borrowers by requiring lenders to go to court to foreclose, creating a backlog of cases. Meanwhile, Attorney General Lisa Madigan is investigating banks’ “robo-signing” practices, involving the creation of  false loan documents.

Also slowing down the sale of distressed properties is the reluctance of banks to lose money. Banks will be banks, of course, and they don’t want to sell foreclosed homes for substantially less than what the borrower owed on the mortgage. (I also see this mindset slowing down and often thwarting short sales, which is why I generally discourage buyers from even pursuing them until the banks get their acts together.)

The bottom line is that Chicago and its suburbs, especially the poor neighborhoods, are full of foreclosures. Buying one requires lots of patience and the acceptance of more risk than you’d encounter in a normal sale. But there are still some good deals out there, and I have helped several of my buyers pursue foreclosed homes that they now happily own.

Written by Sue Fox //

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